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Friday, July 25 2014 @ 02:57 PM CDT

Review: Expect Resistance

While I'm not Wayne Price (CrimethInc.'s reviewer of choice), I will still none-the-less try my hand at another brief, yet triumphant review... Recently I finished reading Expect Resistance: a crimethink field manual by the CrimethInc. Ex-Workers' Collective and was very impressed with the overall enjoyability of the book, very nicely done! Once I started reading the book, it was tough to put down, which seems to be a good sign in my still unwritten book. If you've been a fan of CrimethInc. propaganda in the past, you'll probably most likely appreciate their new book; as I found it to be jam packed with misbehaving words and riotous graphics throughout. If you've never read CrimethInc. literature and hate your job then you should also check it out. The point being that in all, it is just a book and in the end, it is really all up to you (dear reader) and how you apply their propaganda into action. I think this is what CrimethInc. would want, if nothing else - for you to use their goods well.

Review: Expect Resistance

By Wild Turkey Desire

Published over at the tofurkies roost

The revolution is not going
to happen tomorrow -
it's never going to happen.
It's taking place right now.
It is an alternate universe
that runs parallel to this one,
waiting for you to switch sides.
While I'm not Wayne Price (CrimethInc.'s reviewer of choice), I will still none-the-less try my hand at another brief, yet triumphant review... Recently I finished reading Expect Resistance: a crimethink field manual by the CrimethInc. Ex-Workers' Collective and was very impressed with the overall enjoyability of the book, very nicely done! Once I started reading the book, it was tough to put down, which seems to be a good sign in my still unwritten book. If you've been a fan of CrimethInc. propaganda in the past, you'll probably most likely appreciate their new book; as I found it to be jam packed with misbehaving words and riotous graphics throughout. If you've never read CrimethInc. literature and hate your job then you should also check it out. The point being that in all, it is just a book and in the end, it is really all up to you (dear reader) and how you apply their propaganda into action. I think this is what CrimethInc. would want, if nothing else - for you to use their goods well.

A Quick Word About the Authors

Whois CrimethInc.? Former British Prime Minister, Tony Blair might call them part of the "anarchists' travelling circus". Well... almost Senor Blair, according to their website www.crimethinc.com "the CrimethInc. Ex-Workers' Collective is a decentralized anarchist collective composed of many cells which act independently in pursuit of a freer and more joyous world". They delve further in another essay, to say that "our essential project is to nurture anti-authoritarian consciousness and desires outside the traditional sites of workplace organizing and identity politics."

They go on to say:

Our sole aim, our raison d’(tm)tre, is to create situations that have liberatory potential. That is the purpose of all the books and posters and convergences. In and of themselves, they are worthless, irrelevant—but if they enable people to live moments of freedom, whether individually for instants or together over the course of decades, then we have succeeded. We ask to be judged by this criterion alone. - from the CrimethInc. Far East blog
Or, more simply put - according to the folding back cover of Expect Resistance - they would enjoy being the pallbearers at Western civilization's funeral. CrimethInc. is probably distantly related to the barbarians of old that would knock the heads off of their enemies sculptures upon "victory".

Now on to the book burning competition!

Tremble a little upon the threshold. Today you have been born, out of abysmal sorrow and useless knowledge, words, devices, instruments of calculation and destruction; out of hates and holocausts, ghosts and gruesome fates, crimes, visions, and disaster - and despair, now a friend and helpful.
Well, in regards to the book, a lot can be said, but I'm only going to touch on some areas (after all I have a life you know). One thing that I really liked about it was the front and back covers, with expandable flaps, making it probably the closest a book has ever come to flying. Is this because they used the same unionized printer in Louiseville, Quebec that the Harry Potter books used? The spine is also different from most books, in the fact that it allows you to lay the book down flat while reading among other things, and makes for a less frustrating, more joyful experience. If I were to ever publish a book, I'd want the covers and spine to be in the same style, plus the soy ink and recycled paper that was used in the books production couldn't hurt either.

The book starts off like a garden of forking paths:

I had long awaited a book that resisted all parallels with other books save the use of ink and type: a book through which I might wander, losing myself in labyrinths and coming upon fantastic citadels to which I could not retrace my steps; a book into which I might plunge, skipping pages as a little girl skips rope, never to return to the world in which I'd began - emerging instead in another, or at least equipped to build one.
Immediately, upon reading that I thought of one of my favorite authors - Jorge Luis Borges. Interestingly enough, in his youth Borges participated in an "ultraists" literary movement of sorts that would among other things wheatpaste their propaganda to the cities lonely walls at night. The "ultraists" were radicals, and if they had a manifesto it would probably be one of the last essays printed in Expect Resistance, entitled "Maximum Ultraism". Too bad, Borges turned into a conservative later on in life, maybe if he had the chance to read CrimethInc. he wouldn't have fallen in with the dark side.

Probably what I liked most about the book was that at times, it felt like some of my close friends were writing it, even though I know they didn't (most of my friends hate reading and writing). So, I guess what I'm trying to say, is that the book relates to folks on a certain level, and I think this was intended by the clever authors. Another thing I liked about the book was the more personal stories scattered throughout the book that are written in red ink, yes red ink! At first I thought, oh geeez! I'm already blind and now I have to read red freaking ink! But in reality it wasn't that bad, I guess my teachers in elementary school were lying to me about red ink. But, I wonder how it would be on someone who is color blind?

Another thing I liked about the book, was how it unearthed the ideas surrounding friendship. This quote from the book sums it up:

On the battlefield, the grim anarchists pull down masks over knit brows and clenched teeth. As the sun rises through the tear gas, we thank our lucky stars we still have a common enemy so we can put off rifts and rivalries for another day. We carry with us our disappointments in ourselves, in each other, and in our dreams - and also our shame, our arrogance and fear, our martyr complexes, our despair. We know better than to hope for victory: after this fight, even after any revolution, there will always be another conflict, another line to draw. Even if every government and board of directors abdicated and no one stepped forward to replace them, we would simply commence fighting each other. This is what we do, it is all we have learned, it is all we can do with our bitterness.
Kind of reminds me of how incredibly unthoughtful some people can be over the Internet and outside of it. Is this why 95% of the time I hate internet discussions? Are people really that bitter inside? Do some folks always have to fight against something, even if they sound like a jackass in the process (no offense to the animal)? As I like to say, "when the typing gets tough, it's time to turn off the computer and go outside for a taste of fresh air".

In conclusion, the book is only eight dollars - a decent price to pay considering the fact that, the money will be helping them and possibly you dear reader, destroy capitalism. Although, I think I did find a couple of grammatical errors in the book, they were probably just trying to destroy language at the same time (a feat which can be tough when in the act of writing a book, but is still not impossible, just check out James Joyce). Anyways, all of the three-hundred and forty-four pages of the book smell good enough to read, so do it!

All of this is nothing compared to what I'll be able to tell you tomorrow night if I'm still alive

Definitions to learn for the next pop quiz hotshot!

Post-left anarchy... is a recent current in anarchist thought that seeks to distance itself from the traditional Left (communism, social liberalism, social democracy, etc.) and to escape the confines of ideology in general. It has rapidly developed since the fall of the Soviet Union, which many view as the death of authoritarian leftism; however, its roots are clearly visible in the ideas of the 1960's Situationists. It is not an independent "movement" as such but rather a critical way of thinking about anarchist ideas. Post-leftists frequently use the word anarchy instead of anarchism to avoid the -ism suffix's connotations of doctrine. - from Anarchy Magazine's FAQs
disclaimer: this review try's, but surely fails at times to be "funny", meant in the best spirit of joy, just in case you're wondering... don't hate because my jokes are bad!
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Review: Expect Resistance | 2 comments | Create New Account
The following comments are owned by whomever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
Review: Expect Resistance
Authored by: Anonymous on Tuesday, February 12 2008 @ 06:43 PM CST
Well, I had been thinking about posting a review of Expect Resistance on Infoshop myself, but WTD beat me to it, so instead, I'll just add a few comments to this thread.

First, I want to congratulate WTD for including those graphics from the book; I wouldn't have thought of that myself, and they give a good sense of how important the visual element is in some of CrimethInc's work. These pictures, as well as some Situationist-inspired cartoon panels and other artwork, help to illustrate the theoretical aspects of the piece in an entertaining way.

Secondly, for the benefit of anyone not already familiar with Crimethinc literature, I wanted to note that most of their work is published anonymously, so one can't really critique a particular Crimethinc author. Thus, it is only possible to speak of the opinions or ideas of Crimethinc as a whole. The exact organizational structure and membership of CrimethInc is unclear (as WTD points out, they describe it only as a "decentralized anarchist collective"), although there have been annual CrimethInc convergences and Crimethinc tours, in addition to their two web sites and a number of books, videos, and newsletters put out over the last few years. Based on what I've read (and heard from traveling Crimethincers), I believe that there is a strong continuity in the ideas that have been put out under the Crimethinc label over time.

The basic structure of the book is this: several fictional narrators - Kate, Pablo, and Marshall - each tell their own intersecting stories (covering a period of several years) of resistance, friendship, and individual challenges; these are the sections in red that WTD referred to. Interspersed with these are short essays, musings, rants, or whatever you want to call them, that explore the theoretical or philosophical themes brought out by each section of narrative. The themes covered are both personal and political - for example, adultery, democracy, revolution, infighting, etc. - in short, all the issues that a group of people committed to struggling for personal and social liberation could expect to face. The dates and locations in the stories are generally not specified, although some resemblances to actual places and events can be inferred, such as the Sept. 2001 attack on the World Trade Center, and various IMF or WTO protests.

I was mostly in agreement with the ideas expressed in Expect Resistance, with a few minor exceptions. At times, CrimethInc seems to imply that a true revolutionary must be constantly engaging in risky physical confrontations with the authorities. For example, at one point, they made what I consider to be the highly dubious assertion that one of the reasons for the success of Martin Luther King's tactics of non-violent protest was the implied threat of violence contained in Malcolm X's aggressive rhetoric; however, non-violent struggle can be a very effective tactic in its own right, under certain circumstances. Pacifism certainly isn't synonymous with passivity.

What Crimethinc excels at is infusing revolutionary activity with poetry and passion, forsaking dull theorizing and programmatic politics for meaningful praxis, where there is no disconnect between theory, revolutionary struggle, and daily life. For them, revolution is not a goal to be reached at some unspecified point in the future, but a way of living our lives right now.

The wonderful thing about all this is that Crimethinc
Review: Expect Resistance
Authored by: Pathology on Wednesday, February 13 2008 @ 02:16 AM CST
cool, thanks for the 2 good reviews...