Infoshop Library

A comprehensive digital library on anarchism, politics, culture, history, activism, social change movements and much more.

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Featured Books, Articles and Texts

Authors

Bakunin, Mikhail

Crass, Chris

de Cleyre, Voltairine

Guerin, Daniel

Goldman, Emma

Ervin, Lorenzo Komboa

Luxemburg, Rosa

Malatesta, Errico

Neal, Dave

Perlman, Fredy

Zerzan, John

Recent Additions

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Oct
Chuck0's picture

China's migrant workers

Wildcat's history and analysis of internal migration in China from the 1950s until today.

Article translated from German supplement "Unrest in China", wildcat #80, Winter 2007/08

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11
Oct
Chuck0's picture

The Landlubber Pirates

another fable for the kiddies by Robin Banks

Once upon a time there was a band of pirates. At least, they called themselves pirates, and they wore what they thought were pirate outfits -- black eyepatches, filthy bandanas and hats, worn-out parts of sailors' uniforms, and so on. They spoke in slang that they believed to be quite piratish: "Arr, matey! Shiver me timbers! Walk the plank!"

However, despite their clothing and speech and self-identification as pirates, they never left shore. In fact, they spent most of their time on the beach, using an old tarnished spyglass to watch other pirates put out to sea or make raids on frigates.

"Yarrrr!" they would shout when they spotted a pirate ship overtaking a merchant vessel. "Board 'em! Board 'em! No mercy for the merchant scum!" At the height of their excitement they would often unfurl a battered old Jolly Roger and wave it frantically in support of their seagoing brethren.

Sat
11
Oct
Chuck0's picture

Between Infoshops and Insurrection

Between Infoshops and Insurrection U.S. Anarchism, Movement Building, and the Racial Order By Joel Olson This is a slightly revised version of a chapter from the new book Contemporary Anarchist Studies, edited by Randall Amster, Luis Fernandez, etc. (Routledge 2009). Joel Olson teaches political theory at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff and has been around anarchist circles in the United States for many years. Anarchism has always had a hard time dealing with race. In its classical era from the time of Proudhon in the 1840s to Goldman in the 1930s, it sought to inspire the working class to rise up against the church, the state, and capitalism. This focus on “god, government, and gold” was revolutionary, but it didn’t quite know how to confront the racial order in the United States. Most U.S. anarchist organizations and activists opposed racism in principle, but they tended to assume that it was a byproduct of class exploitation.

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11
Oct
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Democracy is Direct

by Cindy Milstein

These days, words seem to be thrown around like so much loose change. Democracy is no exception.

We hear demands to "democraticize" the World Bank, IMF, and WTO. Some contend that "democracy" is the standard for good government. Others allege that "more," "better," or even "participatory democracy" is the needed antidote to our woes. At the heart of these well-intentioned but misguided sentiments beats a genuine desire: to gain control over our lives.

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11
Oct
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Anarchists and the right to choose

Aileen O'Carroll

We envisage an anarchist society as a society where people are free to make choices about their own lives. We picture a society where decisions are made at the lowest effective level. For women, this includes the decision whether or not to become pregnant, whether or not to remain pregnant, whether or not to have children.

It is possible to be an anarchist and to have a moral objection to abortion. It is not possible to be an anarchist and not support the right to choose. For if the right to choose does not rest solely with pregnant women, where would it lie; with the state, with lawyers and the courts, with police?

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MAN BITES DOG! A Tale of Reverse Discrimination

by Robin Banks

"In journalism school we learned that it's not news when 'dog bites man,' but it is news when 'man bites dog.'" -- Carole Simpson, ABC News

A long time ago, in a land far, far away -- a land so far away that it could not possibly be relevant to our land, "our land" being a funny way of saying "the land that we stole from the natives a long time ago, so long ago that everybody has pretty much forgotten about it and all the natives are nearly wiped out anyways" -- there was an epidemic going on.

An epidemic of men biting dogs!

Now, the dogs had been biting the men for years and years. But that was the way it had always been, and so people really didn't think too much of it. It wasn't news, really -- dogs had always bitten men, and that was just the way it was, nothing you could do about it, and so on.

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11
Oct
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The New War Against Terror

by Noam Chomksy

Transcribed from audio (recorded at The Technology & Culture Forum at MIT)

Everyone knows it's the TV people who run the world [crowd laugher]. I just got orders that I'm supposed to be here, not there. Well the last talk Igave at this forum was on a light pleasant topic. It was about how humans are an endangered species and given the nature of their institutions theyare likely to destroy themselves in a fairly short time. So this time there is a little relief and we have a pleasant topic instead, the new war onterror. Unfortunately, the world keeps coming up with things that make itmore and more horrible as we proceed.

Assume 2 Conditions for this Talk

I'm going to assume 2 conditions for this talk.

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11
Oct
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USA - Elections 2000

Noam Chomsky

The most striking fact about the November 2000 elections is that they were astatistical tie (for Congress as well, virtually). The most interestingquestion is what this shows, if anything, about the state of functioningdemocracy.

For many commentators, the fact that the presidency "is hinging on a fewhundred votes" reveals the extraordinary health and vigour of Americandemocracy (former State Department spokesperson James Rubin). An alternativeinterpretation is that it confirms the conclusion that there was no electionin any sense that takes the concept of democracy seriously.

Under what conditions would we expect 100 million votes to divide 50-50,with variations that fall well within expected margins of error of 1-2%?There is a very simple model that would yield such expectations: people werevoting at random.

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11
Oct
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Another World Is Possible . . . But What Kind, and Shaped By Whom?

by Cindy Milstein

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